smallcamera:

Kuala Lumpur’s light trails

This just happens to be the view overlooking one of my two favourite highways in KL. But this is the first highway I ever drove on. The place where I did my first 120 km/h. The one with the best views of KL’s skyline.
It takes me just 7 minutes on a good day to get from home to KLCC’s parking lot on AKLEH. I know it like the back of my hand. The RM 1.50 gateway into my city. My home. My Ampang. 
Homesickness has kicked in.
(typed under the influence of Mikky Ekko’s- Pull Me Down)

smallcamera:

Kuala Lumpur’s light trails

This just happens to be the view overlooking one of my two favourite highways in KL. But this is the first highway I ever drove on. The place where I did my first 120 km/h. The one with the best views of KL’s skyline.

It takes me just 7 minutes on a good day to get from home to KLCC’s parking lot on AKLEH. I know it like the back of my hand. The RM 1.50 gateway into my city. My home. My Ampang. 

Homesickness has kicked in.

(typed under the influence of Mikky Ekko’s- Pull Me Down)

"Show me where trouble goes"

The nonsense I used to write when I was 18 is really quite amusing. One of the things I wish I dared to do is post some of these drafts I wrote 5 years ago. But everyone is scared of some sort of judgement and I am too.

Gosh I miss KL so much at this moment.

thepeoplesrecord:

On Ferguson: To be relevant is to be powerfulSeptember 2, 2014
The murder of Michael Brown by the Ferguson Police creates an opportunity for millions of people to confront the tragic and mundane daily realities of White Supremacy and Anti-Blackness, which are part of everyday public and private life for so many people in this country. It is imperative to rethink the spectacle that has been created out of Ferguson, and to contextualize it within as many structural realities of racism that we can comprehend. In the past three decades, we’ve seen patterns of racist violence continue in America. Less than 25 years ago, we saw L.A. Police excessively chase and beat Rodney King, and the racially charged riots that followed. Now, we see Ferguson. Less than ten years ago, we heard “I am Oscar Grant” (after Oscar Grant III was fatally shot by BART police in Oakland). Now, we hear Ferguson. Less than 5 years ago, we saw the largest police department in the U.S.A employ racist Stop and Frisk Policing tactics, and the enormous campaigns that rallied against those tactics. Now, we rally around Ferguson. Less than 3 years ago, we saw millions of Black and Brown youth wearing hoodies declaring, “my skin color is not a crime,” in honor of Trayvon Martin. Now, we honor the memory of Michael Brown. And Ferguson. Less than a week after we saw protests in Ferguson, we saw the police killing Kajieme Powell just blocks away. This is not to compare the lives of our fallen brothers and sisters. May they rest in peace in a heaven of liberation. May their families know that their pain is important. It’s just as important as analyzing why local police departments get millions of dollars to purchase military weapons from the equivalent of the U.S. Military’s Goodwill Store, and analyzing why we don’t see the police kill White young people in the same way. These are two different ways of recognizing the trauma inflicted on those directly affected by White Supremacy; they are equally necessary in resisting the cruel and unusual force being used against People of Color by the U.S.A. 
We must look at Ferguson as another battle of resistance to make People of Color relevant to the redistribution of power in the United States. The 13th Amendment was a work in progress from when the first person was abducted from Africa and deposited as property, and not as a person, in the eyes of the United States of America. The implementation of the 13th amendment to end slavery is still in process. We need to recognize the difference between a true end to slavery and the mutations of slavery that we currently live in. The creation of capital through the killing of the Black body became slavery. During Reconstruction, a sense of solidarity grew between “freed” Black people and poor White people. Jim Crow made segregation laws to enforce that even the poorest White person was still not Black in the eyes of the U.S.A. The rise of mass incarceration has been driven by the same mechanism that drove slavery — the creation of capital through racism. The United States incarcerates more people than any other country in the world, and non-White people are incarcerated at rates much higher than White people for all crimes, especially non-violent and petty crimes. This all only took approximately 400 years to create in this country. Dismantling this reality is not only going to take a long time but will also require numerous acts of resistance. 
Public education likes to declare that the Civil Rights movement was a victory. In fact, 50 years after the Civil Rights Act, Black men are nearly right where they started economically, but with a very high incarceration rate. A person does not just end up in prison as an exchange for an alleged crime. Our incarceration rates start with police forces. Cops (Constables on Patrol), originated in the U.S.A. as brigades of (White) people who surveilled both public and private property and searched for “runaway slaves.” Slaves were considered property of a slave owner, and if they fled for freedom they were “runaway property.” Eventually, there was too much work for these private slave brigades so every level of government in this country began to fund these patrols. These patrols became police departments. The police were not established as a response to public safety. The police were not established to help people in bad relationships, or to solve problems between groups of people. The police were created as a response in order to protect property that was already stolen through the process of slavery, and keep it safe for self-declared slave owners. When a country is founded by slave owners and founded to declare their capital independent of Great Britain — when a country is built on slavery and colonialism — what else would be the plight of this country’s public institutions? 
Full article

thepeoplesrecord:

On Ferguson: To be relevant is to be powerful
September 2, 2014

The murder of Michael Brown by the Ferguson Police creates an opportunity for millions of people to confront the tragic and mundane daily realities of White Supremacy and Anti-Blackness, which are part of everyday public and private life for so many people in this country. It is imperative to rethink the spectacle that has been created out of Ferguson, and to contextualize it within as many structural realities of racism that we can comprehend. 

In the past three decades, we’ve seen patterns of racist violence continue in America. Less than 25 years ago, we saw L.A. Police excessively chase and beat Rodney King, and the racially charged riots that followed. Now, we see Ferguson. Less than ten years ago, we heard “I am Oscar Grant” (after Oscar Grant III was fatally shot by BART police in Oakland). Now, we hear Ferguson. Less than 5 years ago, we saw the largest police department in the U.S.A employ racist Stop and Frisk Policing tactics, and the enormous campaigns that rallied against those tactics. Now, we rally around Ferguson. Less than 3 years ago, we saw millions of Black and Brown youth wearing hoodies declaring, “my skin color is not a crime,” in honor of Trayvon Martin. Now, we honor the memory of Michael Brown. And Ferguson. 

Less than a week after we saw protests in Ferguson, we saw the police killing Kajieme Powell just blocks away. 

This is not to compare the lives of our fallen brothers and sisters. May they rest in peace in a heaven of liberation. May their families know that their pain is important. It’s just as important as analyzing why local police departments get millions of dollars to purchase military weapons from the equivalent of the U.S. Military’s Goodwill Store, and analyzing why we don’t see the police kill White young people in the same way. These are two different ways of recognizing the trauma inflicted on those directly affected by White Supremacy; they are equally necessary in resisting the cruel and unusual force being used against People of Color by the U.S.A. 

We must look at Ferguson as another battle of resistance to make People of Color relevant to the redistribution of power in the United States. The 13th Amendment was a work in progress from when the first person was abducted from Africa and deposited as property, and not as a person, in the eyes of the United States of America. The implementation of the 13th amendment to end slavery is still in process. We need to recognize the difference between a true end to slavery and the mutations of slavery that we currently live in. 

The creation of capital through the killing of the Black body became slavery. During Reconstruction, a sense of solidarity grew between “freed” Black people and poor White people. Jim Crow made segregation laws to enforce that even the poorest White person was still not Black in the eyes of the U.S.A. 

The rise of mass incarceration has been driven by the same mechanism that drove slavery — the creation of capital through racism. The United States incarcerates more people than any other country in the world, and non-White people are incarcerated at rates much higher than White people for all crimes, especially non-violent and petty crimes. This all only took approximately 400 years to create in this country. Dismantling this reality is not only going to take a long time but will also require numerous acts of resistance. 

Public education likes to declare that the Civil Rights movement was a victory. In fact, 50 years after the Civil Rights Act, Black men are nearly right where they started economically, but with a very high incarceration rate. 

A person does not just end up in prison as an exchange for an alleged crime. Our incarceration rates start with police forces. 

Cops (Constables on Patrol), originated in the U.S.A. as brigades of (White) people who surveilled both public and private property and searched for “runaway slaves.” Slaves were considered property of a slave owner, and if they fled for freedom they were “runaway property.” Eventually, there was too much work for these private slave brigades so every level of government in this country began to fund these patrols. These patrols became police departments. 

The police were not established as a response to public safety. The police were not established to help people in bad relationships, or to solve problems between groups of people. The police were created as a response in order to protect property that was already stolen through the process of slavery, and keep it safe for self-declared slave owners. When a country is founded by slave owners and founded to declare their capital independent of Great Britain — when a country is built on slavery and colonialism — what else would be the plight of this country’s public institutions? 

Full article

Adjusting to new daylight & night hours. And class tomorrow. Bismillahirrahmanirrahim. 

Adjusting to new daylight & night hours. And class tomorrow. Bismillahirrahmanirrahim. 

"I have a deep fear of being too much. That one day
I will find my someone, and they will realize that I am
a hurricane. That they will step back and be intimidated
by my muchness."

Michelle K., Rumbles From My Head (via michellekpoems)

Or my contrasting muchness and emptiness. Ladida.

islamic-quotes:

He knows

islamic-quotes:

He knows

storiesofthesahabah:

Indeed, when we see a person suffering so much in this world, we feel the first hand sympathy for them.
But lest we forget that these people are the most loved by Allah for He indeed tests those whom He loves and gives the hardest tests to His best soldiers.
We can never comfort the mothers who lost their children, the fathers who lost their whole family, the sisters who lost their brothers and the brothers who lost their fountains of joy with words that merely come from our mouths.
Only in the words of Allah Azza Wa Jall can we comfort their hearts, narrating those that Prophet Muhammad Sallallahu Alaihi Wassalaam have told to those before us, and have that firm belief that indeed the Help of Allah is near and that the Promise of Allah is the truth.
I have no words to comfort you dear mothers of Gaza, but indeed you have raised Lions of this Ummah, I have no words to comfort you dear fathers of Gaza but Allah Azza Wa Jall knows how you have tried to protected your brethren, I have no words to comfort you my dear children but let you feel that you are in our hearts and thoughts and that we are praying for all of you, I have no words to comfort you O dear People of Gaza…but let these words of the Prophet Muhammad Sallallahu Alaihi Wassalaam reach you…
"The person who had the most pleasing life in this world, of any of the people of hell, will be summoned on Resurrection Day and utterly plunged into the hellfire, then asked, 
‘O human being, have you ever beheld any good at all; have you ever felt a single joy?’
and he will say, ‘No by God, my Lord.’ 
And the most miserable sufferer in this world, of any of the people of paradise, will be summoned and utterly plunged into paradise, then asked,
‘O human being, have you ever seen any bad at all; have you ever experienced a single misery?’ 
and he will say, ‘No by God, my Lord: I have never seen any bad or suffered a single misery’ .”
Indeed you all have suffered indescribable sufferings in this world, and we all pray that Allah Azza Wa Jall grants you and your family the joy and happiness that no thing in this dunya could ever give, and that is being in the company of our Rabb. 
You are our inspirations, your courage, your stand and your firm belief in Allah Azza Wa Jall indeed puts us in shame.
May Allah Azza Wa Jall bring better days. May you all survive this sufferings and if death comes upon you all then we pray that you all soar high in the gardens of Paradise.
O dear mothers of Gaza, safeguard yourselves for indeed in your wombs will rise a nation of Lions, the likes of Hamza Ibn Abdul Muttalib, ‘Umar Ibn Al Khattab, ‘Ali Ibn Abi Talib, Khalid Ibn Al Walid, Salahu’ddin Al Ayuubi, that will defend the remaining of the Muslim Ummah, and despair not for Allah is the Giver of Victory, and He has Promised Victory Upon Muslims! 
Allahu’akbar.
So let this reach them, let these words reach the people of Gaza.
Zohayma ____
F.N.
[1] Muslim ibn al-Hajjaj. Sahih Muslim | Dar al-Fikr, 1403/1983.

storiesofthesahabah:

Indeed, when we see a person suffering so much in this world, we feel the first hand sympathy for them.

But lest we forget that these people are the most loved by Allah for He indeed tests those whom He loves and gives the hardest tests to His best soldiers.

We can never comfort the mothers who lost their children, the fathers who lost their whole family, the sisters who lost their brothers and the brothers who lost their fountains of joy with words that merely come from our mouths.

Only in the words of Allah Azza Wa Jall can we comfort their hearts, narrating those that Prophet Muhammad Sallallahu Alaihi Wassalaam have told to those before us, and have that firm belief that indeed the Help of Allah is near and that the Promise of Allah is the truth.

I have no words to comfort you dear mothers of Gaza, but indeed you have raised Lions of this Ummah, I have no words to comfort you dear fathers of Gaza but Allah Azza Wa Jall knows how you have tried to protected your brethren, I have no words to comfort you my dear children but let you feel that you are in our hearts and thoughts and that we are praying for all of you, I have no words to comfort you O dear People of Gaza…but let these words of the Prophet Muhammad Sallallahu Alaihi Wassalaam reach you…

"The person who had the most pleasing life in this world, of any of the people of hell, will be summoned on Resurrection Day and utterly plunged into the hellfire, then asked,

‘O human being, have you ever beheld any good at all; have you ever felt a single joy?’

and he will say, ‘No by God, my Lord.’

And the most miserable sufferer in this world, of any of the people of paradise, will be summoned and utterly plunged into paradise, then asked,

‘O human being, have you ever seen any bad at all; have you ever experienced a single misery?’

and he will say, ‘No by God, my Lord: I have never seen any bad or suffered a single misery’ .”

Indeed you all have suffered indescribable sufferings in this world, and we all pray that Allah Azza Wa Jall grants you and your family the joy and happiness that no thing in this dunya could ever give, and that is being in the company of our Rabb.

You are our inspirations, your courage, your stand and your firm belief in Allah Azza Wa Jall indeed puts us in shame.

May Allah Azza Wa Jall bring better days. May you all survive this sufferings and if death comes upon you all then we pray that you all soar high in the gardens of Paradise.

O dear mothers of Gaza, safeguard yourselves for indeed in your wombs will rise a nation of Lions, the likes of Hamza Ibn Abdul Muttalib, ‘Umar Ibn Al Khattab, ‘Ali Ibn Abi Talib, Khalid Ibn Al Walid, Salahu’ddin Al Ayuubi, that will defend the remaining of the Muslim Ummah, and despair not for Allah is the Giver of Victory, and He has Promised Victory Upon Muslims!

Allahu’akbar.

So let this reach them, let these words reach the people of Gaza.

Zohayma
____

F.N.

[1] Muslim ibn al-Hajjaj. Sahih Muslim | Dar al-Fikr, 1403/1983.

"Please waste your time on me."
Six Word Story (via bl-ossomed)
"The problem is you’ve been told and not told. That’s what I’ve seen while I’ve been here. You’ve been told but none of you really understand. So I’ve decided I’ll talk to you in a way that you will understand. Do you know what happens to children when they grow up? No, you don’t, because nobody knows."